October 11, 2021

Boston ROOF DECK

I return to the Back Bay for a tour of a roof deck that is going to be an urban paradise. And I’ll address the mystery of the seam in the ceiling. Let’s go!

YOU’LL NEVER WANT TO LEAVE THIS ROOF DECK

Seriously… this roof deck is going to be beyond impressive! The steel posts and braces are up, one IPE wall is already installed (plastic spacers ensure even spacing of the decking all the way up) and we went with exposed screws. The steel fence was fabricated off-site, approved by the Back Bay Association, and hoisted up with a crane. We’ll be adding a custom stainless steel kitchen with cabinetry, grill, and a refrigerator as well as a concrete fire pit (gas), and the gray pavers will complement the IPE as it weathers over time. This deck will be more than simply outdoor space—it’s going to be a relaxation destination.

THE SEAM IN THE CEILING

The homeowners had stopped by to check on progress and I got a call from them with this question: “Hey, what’s that seam in the ceiling for?” It’s too intentionally done to be a mistake; but they had no idea of what its purpose was. Excellent question and here’s why we did it.

If you think about concrete flatwork, intentional cuts—referred to as control joints—are made using a concrete saw and in a predetermined pattern. This is done to help control where and how cracks will appear in the poured concrete; if cracks due to shrinkage or temperature changes occur, the cracks will follow the cuts versus randomly appearing.

It’s similar with our plaster ceiling—we have two stop beads pushed up tight against each other and this creates a straight line seam in the middle of the ceiling where a stress crack might commonly occur. If these two ceiling planes were to move independently, we won’t get a crack off the corner of the wall. And that is why there is a seam in the ceiling—design with a purpose.    

It’s time to discover what NS Builders can intentionally craft for you! Contact us today to get started on your custom dream home. Together, we can make it happen.

—Nick Schiffer

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